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Slip and Fall Risks In a Warehouse Setting

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, slip and fall accidents are responsible for 15 percent of all accidental deaths and 25 percent of all injury claims on the job. For a business, these injuries may cost an average of $41,000. Slip and fall incidents qualify as “general injury accidents” and have potential to occur across a broad range of workplaces.

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What You Need to Know About Electric Scooter Lawsuits

In recent years, major cities across the United States have seen an influx of electric scooters, also known as E-scooters. Building off the momentum of bike share and rental services, electric scooters have been presented as a new convenient way to travel, without having to rely on public transportation. Yet from the get-go, these scooters caused problems and soon became a public safety hazard.

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Comparative Negligence In a Slip and Fall Case

Contrary to popular belief, not all slip and fall accidents on a wet floor will result in a large payout. In reality, these claims tend to have more nuances. Among the variables at play is something called “comparative negligence” – the plaintiff’s responsibility to recognize and avoid a hazard.

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How Clothing and Shoes Affect a Slip and Fall Case

If you experienced a slip and fall on a public surface, chances are you were wearing shoes. Were they appropriate for the conditions you encountered or the job you were hired to perform? These details may seem insignificant at first but, if you decide to pursue a slip and fall claim, the defendant’s legal team could question your choice of footwear.

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Who’s Responsible for Injuries on Icy Pavement?

When winter arrives in New England, we should all be on the lookout for ice and snow on the roads, sidewalks and properties. Especially if you own a business, keeping an eye out is simply not enough. You need a plan of action to remove all accumulation within a reasonable timeframe. Otherwise, the next patron who passes through may slip on a patch of ice out front – and you will likely be held responsible.

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