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CT Watchdog reported earlier in August that the Rosegarden Health and Rehabilitation Center in Waterbury, CT received a $5,000 fine from the state Department of Public Health and is now required to hire a nursing home consultant.

The website’s report is extensive. According to their statements, the fine and consulting requirement came as part of a July 9 consent order, but the observations date back to inspections from November 25 to December 10, 2013.

During these multiple incidents, inspectors from the Department of Public Health noticed that a couple of residents appeared have insufficient hygiene – no signs of showering, uncombed hair, cradle cap, and dirt under their fingernails.

As well, staff appeared to be significantly negligent regarding residents’ care. Their report states that workers did not include a resident’s directive in the physician’s orders, did not follow doctor’s recommendations for care, and did not alert the physician when a resident’s condition significantly changed.

Along with these factors, how the home functions received negative marks. The Department of Public Health report claims that workers have no plan to deal with residents’ falls, have no grooming and hygiene plans for certain residents, and do not have a consistent record-keeping system.

Overall, the home, according to statements, did not appear clean and comfortable. Signs of dirt, stains, and dust, including near multiple hallway vents, were visible throughout the inspection.

The deadline for Rosegarden to comply with the Department of Public Health’s orders ended last month. There’s no word, based on a lack of follow-up, whether the directions are being carried out.

The news comes at the same time the Long-Term Services and Supports for Older Adults and People with Physical Disabilities report lists Connecticut as 12th in the country for elder care. Although strong points were the choice of settings, providers, quality of life and care, and access to care, the state ranked lower for family care support, hospital transitions, and costs.