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The past four years have seen multiple changes and efforts to improve road safety, and ultimately reduce vehicle accidents, in Connecticut. August 2012 was the four-year anniversary of stricter teen driving laws in Connecticut. Along with this, no-texting and distracted driving pledges occurred over the course of 2012, with Trantolo & Trantolo taking part in I-Promise.

Nevertheless, age does not always correlate with safe and secure driving, and the latest effort removes a 106-year-old law. For over a century, Connecticut adults learning to drive were not required to have a permit during their training period. As of January 2, 2013, however, adult drivers must hold a learner’s permit before taking the road test.

Highway safety, lower accident risks, and better understanding of operating a vehicle influenced the change, which the Department of Motor Vehicles announced in early December 2012. According to Patch.com, more than 30,000 individuals yearly, on average, will be affected by the new law.

How will the change work? Adults 18 years old and older working toward a license will receive a permit after passing the knowledge and vision tests and, from that point, must wait 90 days before taking the road test. During this time, all such individuals can only be behind the wheel with a qualified trainer in the vehicle or any other adult over 20 years old who has had a license for four consecutive years without suspension.

However, Patch.com points out, adults falling into this group who passed the knowledge and vision tests prior to January 1, 2013 do not need to obtain a permit before taking the road test and have until April 1 to qualify for a license without doing so.

About this change and its ramifications, Allan F. Williams of the Preusser Research Group, which conducts studies for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, told the press: “There is more license delay than there used to be, so there are more novices 18 and older, and they are vulnerable during the learner period. Connecticut has been in the forefront of GDL policy making, and has one of the strongest licensing systems in the country. This new policy extends their leadership in protecting Connecticut drivers.”